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YACHT

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Photo by Claire, taken in Xining, China in November 2009.


Suitcases, airplane meals, security, layovers, running to catch trains, buses, taxis, strangers holding signs with our name on it, sheets, hotel room shampoo, smells, signs in foreign languages, sweat, communication breakdowns, ordering anxiety, granola bars, plastic bags, sunglasses, computer problems, wi-fi, coats, greenrooms of varying shapes, sizes, scents, and temperatures, fruit plates, untouched six-packs of Kronenburg (or Victoria Bitter, or Becks, or Chinese and Korean beers we can't remember), surly sound dudes, merch tables, sticky floors, magazines, makeup, bathroom stalls...then the show starts.




That's when we enter the Temporary Autonomous Zone. In China, Korea, the many corners of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, in the USA, or in Brazil: no matter how out of place we feel or how far we are from home, once the show starts, there are the kids. Some are very much kids, young and excited. Some aren't physically kids at all, but very much at heart. Some are overwhelmingly cool, fashionable, and "on the level." No matter which kind of kids they are, it's always a relief to see them. If we've learned one thing from touring every corner of this world this year, it's that "the underground" is a consistent phenomenon, one which varies only slightly in color and style from place to place. Kids are kids, and seeing them in Korean basement clubs, Chinese steampunk bars, or German discos is like stepping into an international embassy of adjusted normality -- or, rather, into the home lodge of a broad-reaching secret society with the power to change reality.



China proved to us that the temporary autonomous zone thrives even with censored Internet.



We've always felt that the performer-audience divide is the greatest problem YACHT has to overcome. By this we mean the vast and seemingly uncrossable boundary between us and them, the people who come to the show. We hate the old idea that "the artist sacrifices talent for money, and the audience sacrifices money for talent," because it implies that once tickets are paid, it is the audience's role to be passive, to accept what is presented to them as a return on investment. If the performance isn't what was expected -- "hey, I paid good money for this!" Of course, money is an inescapable part of the interaction, but we try to do everything we can to render that division between stage and floor transparent, if not annihilated. There aren't many existing models for us to follow, because this very separation is what defines performance, what distills a personality into a persona.




We didn't know what to expect from South Korea. New lands bring an equal measure of promise and trepidation.



We see the show as a pirate utopia, a radically demilitarized zone, an oasis of separateness from the foreign world outside. YACHT presents it, of course, and leads the way, but our ultimate goal is for the YACHT show to be a work of art without an author. From the first step inside the room, the audience should feel as though they are members, not watchers. It's a society of its own, a completely ephemeral secret society with its own spontaneously generated codes of behavior, which differ from show to show. It's owned equally by everyone in attendance.


And it doesn't matter where it takes place.



The Ute: a special breed of truck/car hybrid in Australia that we became obsessed with photographing.



It's with this in mind that we leave the hectic touring of 2009 and step into the fresh new reality of 2010. Schooled, humbled, and renewed. In the future, we will no longer be alone: when YACHT comes to your town, YACHT will not be a two-person commando of experience, but a larger system, a heavier and less predictable experiment in vibe control. Open the doors and prepare to participate.

posted 7 years ago

Photo by Claire, taken in Xining, China in November 2009.


Suitcases, airplane meals, security, layovers, running to catch trains, buses, taxis, strangers holding signs with our name on it, sheets, hotel room shampoo, smells, signs in foreign languages, sweat, communication breakdowns, ordering anxiety, granola bars, plastic bags, sunglasses, computer problems, wi-fi, coats, greenrooms of varying shapes, sizes, scents, and temperatures, fruit plates, untouched six-packs of Kronenburg (or Victoria Bitter, or Becks, or Chinese and Korean beers we can't remember), surly sound dudes, merch tables, sticky floors, magazines, makeup, bathroom stalls...then the show starts.




That's when we enter the Temporary Autonomous Zone. In China, Korea, the many corners of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, in the USA, or in Brazil: no matter how out of place we feel or how far we are from home, once the show starts, there are the kids. Some are very much kids, young and excited. Some aren't physically kids at all, but very much at heart. Some are overwhelmingly cool, fashionable, and "on the level." No matter which kind of kids they are, it's always a relief to see them. If we've learned one thing from touring every corner of this world this year, it's that "the underground" is a consistent phenomenon, one which varies only slightly in color and style from place to place. Kids are kids, and seeing them in Korean basement clubs, Chinese steampunk bars, or German discos is like stepping into an international embassy of adjusted normality -- or, rather, into the home lodge of a broad-reaching secret society with the power to change reality.





China proved to us that the temporary autonomous zone thrives even with censored Internet.



We've always felt that the performer-audience divide is the greatest problem YACHT has to overcome. By this we mean the vast and seemingly uncrossable boundary between us and them, the people who come to the show. We hate the old idea that "the artist sacrifices talent for money, and the audience sacrifices money for talent," because it implies that once tickets are paid, it is the audience's role to be passive, to accept what is presented to them as a return on investment. If the performance isn't what was expected -- "hey, I paid good money for this!" Of course, money is an inescapable part of the interaction, but we try to do everything we can to render that division between stage and floor transparent, if not annihilated. There aren't many existing models for us to follow, because this very separation is what defines performance, what distills a personality into a persona.






We didn't know what to expect from South Korea. New lands bring an equal measure of promise and trepidation.



We see the show as a pirate utopia, a radically demilitarized zone, an oasis of separateness from the foreign world outside. YACHT presents it, of course, and leads the way, but our ultimate goal is for the YACHT show to be a work of art without an author. From the first step inside the room, the audience should feel as though they are members, not watchers. It's a society of its own, a completely ephemeral secret society with its own spontaneously generated codes of behavior, which differ from show to show. It's owned equally by everyone in attendance.


And it doesn't matter where it takes place.



The Ute: a special breed of truck/car hybrid in Australia that we became obsessed with photographing.



It's with this in mind that we leave the hectic touring of 2009 and step into the fresh new reality of 2010. Schooled, humbled, and renewed. In the future, we will no longer be alone: when YACHT comes to your town, YACHT will not be a two-person commando of experience, but a larger system, a heavier and less predictable experiment in vibe control. Open the doors and prepare to participate.

posted 7 years ago

Photo by Claire, taken in Xining, China in November 2009.


Suitcases, airplane meals, security, layovers, running to catch trains, buses, taxis, strangers holding signs with our name on it, sheets, hotel room shampoo, smells, signs in foreign languages, sweat, communication breakdowns, ordering anxiety, granola bars, plastic bags, sunglasses, computer problems, wi-fi, coats, greenrooms of varying shapes, sizes, scents, and temperatures, fruit plates, untouched six-packs of Kronenburg (or Victoria Bitter, or Becks, or Chinese and Korean beers we can't remember), surly sound dudes, merch tables, sticky floors, magazines, makeup, bathroom stalls...then the show starts.




That's when we enter the Temporary Autonomous Zone. In China, Korea, the many corners of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, in the USA, or in Brazil: no matter how out of place we feel or how far we are from home, once the show starts, there are the kids. Some are very much kids, young and excited. Some aren't physically kids at all, but very much at heart. Some are overwhelmingly cool, fashionable, and "on the level." No matter which kind of kids they are, it's always a relief to see them. If we've learned one thing from touring every corner of this world this year, it's that "the underground" is a consistent phenomenon, one which varies only slightly in color and style from place to place. Kids are kids, and seeing them in Korean basement clubs, Chinese steampunk bars, or German discos is like stepping into an international embassy of adjusted normality -- or, rather, into the home lodge of a broad-reaching secret society with the power to change reality.





China proved to us that the temporary autonomous zone thrives even with censored Internet.



We've always felt that the performer-audience divide is the greatest problem YACHT has to overcome. By this we mean the vast and seemingly uncrossable boundary between us and them, the people who come to the show. We hate the old idea that "the artist sacrifices talent for money, and the audience sacrifices money for talent," because it implies that once tickets are paid, it is the audience's role to be passive, to accept what is presented to them as a return on investment. If the performance isn't what was expected -- "hey, I paid good money for this!" Of course, money is an inescapable part of the interaction, but we try to do everything we can to render that division between stage and floor transparent, if not annihilated. There aren't many existing models for us to follow, because this very separation is what defines performance, what distills a personality into a persona.




We didn't know what to expect from South Korea. New lands bring an equal measure of promise and trepidation.



We see the show as a pirate utopia, a radically demilitarized zone, an oasis of separateness from the foreign world outside. YACHT presents it, of course, and leads the way, but our ultimate goal is for the YACHT show to be a work of art without an author. From the first step inside the room, the audience should feel as though they are members, not watchers. It's a society of its own, a completely ephemeral secret society with its own spontaneously generated codes of behavior, which differ from show to show. It's owned equally by everyone in attendance.


And it doesn't matter where it takes place.



The Ute: a special breed of truck/car hybrid in Australia that we became obsessed with photographing.



It's with this in mind that we leave the hectic touring of 2009 and step into the fresh new reality of 2010. Schooled, humbled, and renewed. In the future, we will no longer be alone: when YACHT comes to your town, YACHT will not be a two-person commando of experience, but a larger system, a heavier and less predictable experiment in vibe control. Open the doors and prepare to participate.

posted 7 years ago

Some guy displaying the poster as posters are commonly displayed on the internet.


We are thrilled to announce the completion of our most recent "supplementary materials" project. As you may (or may not) know, we have been steadily working on an output of non-musical materials over the course of the last few months, materials which enhance and complement the appreciation of the YACHT worldview. There was the Anthem of the Trinity mixtape, a concise compilation of conscious and subconscious musical influences. Then there came our book, The Secret Teachings of the Mystery Lights: A Handbook for Overcoming Humanity and Becoming Your Own God, a primer to our ideology that is available, at this point, only person-to-person at YACHT concerts. Now comes the YACHT Catalogue of Influences 2007-2009.


The YACHT Catalogue of Influences 2007-2009 is a massive, high-quality print poster overlaid with a subtle two-foot trompe-l'oeil varnish that archives, in totality, all of the non-musical influences which went into the primordial soup of our current philosophy and aesthetic. These run the gamut from Star Trek to Nikola Tesla, the Branch Davidian Seventh Day Adventists, the "Sacred Mirror" paintings of Alex Grey, Aleister Crowley, Raoul Vaneigem's The Revolution of Everyday Life, the teachings of UNARIUS, the films of Pier Paolo Pasolini, and the Whole Earth Catalog -- to mention but a few. All of the influences are meticulously catalogued, reproduced in full-color, and handily indexed.


The embossed and hand-numbered 2.3" x 3' spot-varnished poster is for sale now at the Marriage Records website and comes shipped in a heavy-duty triangular tube stamped with the YACHT insignia. Click below to order:













We are particularly attached to this project because it speaks volumes of our personal truth about what it means to make art in this age of hyper-connectivity: even while working in a void in Marfa, Texas, where we lived while making See Mystery Lights, the endless ephemera of creation filters through your consciousness until one morning you find yourself with a handful of crystallized ideas inspired directly by the work of those who came before you. Like Buckminster Fuller before us, we consider ourselves to be generalists. In this way, we save ourselves from obsolescence. A band, after all, is an evolutionary entity. It breathes and lives like a creature. And overspecialization, in the animal kingdom, is what causes extinction. The world is large and full of mystery, as well as more interesting and beautiful things than two people can ever fully absorb. This poster is a small slice of it, our gift to you.


Thank you to our good friends behind Veneer Magazine for their invaluable help conceptualizing, laying out, and printing this poster.

posted 7 years ago

Some guy displaying the poster as posters are commonly displayed on the internet.


We are thrilled to announce the completion of our most recent "supplementary materials" project. As you may (or may not) know, we have been steadily working on an output of non-musical materials over the course of the last few months, materials which enhance and complement the appreciation of the YACHT worldview. There was the Anthem of the Trinity mix-tape, a concise compilation of conscious and subconscious musical influences. Then there came our book, The Secret Teachings of the Mystery Lights: A Handbook for Overcoming Humanity and Becoming Your Own God, a primer to our ideology that is available, at this point, only person-to-person at YACHT concerts. Now comes the YACHT Catalogue of Influences 2007-2009.


The YACHT Catalogue of Influences 2007-2009 is a massive, high-quality print poster overlaid with a subtle two-foot trompe-l'oeil varnish that archives, in totality, all of the non-musical influences which went into the primordial soup of our current philosophy and aesthetic. These run the gamut from Star Trek to Nikola Tesla, the Branch Davidian Seventh Day Adventists, the "Sacred Mirror" paintings of Alex Grey, Aleister Crowley, Raoul Vaneigem's The Revolution of Everyday Life, the teachings of UNARIUS, the films of Pier Paolo Pasolini, and the Whole Earth Catalog -- to mention but a few. All of the influences are meticulously catalogued, reproduced in full-color, and handily indexed. The 2.3" x 3' poster is for sale now at the Marriage Records website and comes shipped in a heavy-duty triangular tube and stamped with the YACHT insignia.













We are particularly attached to this project because it speaks volumes of our personal truth about what it means to make art in this age of hyper-connectivity: even while working in a void in Marfa, Texas, where we lived while making See Mystery Lights, the endless ephemera of creation filters through your consciousness until one morning you find yourself with a handful of crystallized ideas inspired directly by the work of those who came before you. Like Buckminster Fuller before us, we consider ourselves to be generalists. In this way, we save ourselves from obsolescence. A band, after all, is an evolutionary entity. It breathes and lives like a creature. And overspecialization, in the animal kingdom, is what causes extinction. The world is large and full of mystery, as well as more interesting and beautiful things than two people can ever fully absorb. This poster is a small slice of it, our gift to you.


Thank you to our good friend, the mysterious shadow master behind Veneer Magazine, for his invaluable help conceptualizing, laying out, and printing this poster.

posted 7 years ago
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biography
YACHT is a musical moniker created by electronic musician and multimedia artist Jonathan Warren Bechtolt. YACHT has since 2009 included musician, writer and media artist Claire Evans.

Bechtolt was born in Astoria, Oregon and began playing music as a teenager, dropping out of high school to play drums in his brother’s touring punk band. He started working with electronics in the late 1990s and began releasing solo records under the name YACHT in 2003.

Claire Evans came of age playing in bands in the underground noise scene of Los Angeles, and was part of the Portland-based The World Court. She has presented her PowerPoint performances at MoMA PS1, The Kitchenand the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art and has collaborated with Bechtolt on literally hundreds of projects since they met in 2004.

In 2006, Bechtolt collaborated with Khaela Maricich as half of the pop group The Blow to release Paper Television. Bechtolt toured extensively with The Blow, providing beats and backup vocals until quitting the band in 2007 in order to focus on his work in YACHT.

YACHT live performances include dancing as well as elaborate PowerPoint presentations. Bechtolt documents his pro... (+) expand
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naimagrab (level 37) wrote:
your phoenix armistice remix is AWESOME! hell yes.
7 years ago
SaintKVon (level 3) wrote:
this is great.... like The Knife fight Adult.
7 years ago
AnnieB (level 43) wrote:
just saw you guys open for the yeah yeah yeahs in oakland. digging the slideshow act between songs :)
7 years ago
SunnyDays (level 20) wrote:
You guys remind me of The Pixies. That alone its great. And Claire you reminded me a lot of myself when I started dancing. Love your music, would love even more to dance with you guys

Keep it up!
7 years ago
naimagrab (level 37) wrote:
you guys are awesome! i loved psychic city from first listen and just checked out see mystery lights...so good. hoping to see ring the bell added here soon.
7 years ago
JF (level 24) wrote:
"Psychic City" never fails to make me smile. :-)
7 years ago
sweetadeliine (level 29) wrote:
Fantastic music... the kind of really good music that gets stuck in your head. Thanks for sharing!
7 years ago
waltdiggs (level 24) wrote:
The new album sounds great! Ring the Bell is stuck in my head...you should upload it here and let me know if you're going to! Would love to get a discovery on one of your tunes. Thanks for making awesome music. :-)
7 years ago
bipbop (level 11) wrote:
nice!
7 years ago
YACHT wrote:
Our new album comes out on DFA on July 28th!
7 years ago
waltdiggs (level 24) wrote:
Isn't there a new album coming soon? Or did that happen already?
7 years ago
naimagrab (level 37) wrote:
new song is cool! thank you.
7 years ago
harperbetterfasterstronger (level 33) wrote:
Love the new one, reminds of Architecture in Helsinki a little , awesome stuff!
7 years ago
jbaron (level 17) wrote:
you're a big high five.
7 years ago
theawesomeit (level 11) wrote:
Funny thing, I was just surfing around for good songs and I found some of my friends.... :)

I like the song, it's pretty sweet!!!!
7 years ago
Pataglu (level 35) wrote:
Wataglu !
7 years ago
hannnnnah (level 29) wrote:
woah! cooooool!!! I'm mad I ran out of hearts. I'll be back tomorrow to max heart. yeah!
8 years ago
eopt03 (level 13) wrote:
Put up I Believe In You! One of my favorites!
8 years ago
8 ears wrote:
hi,

we are from kuala lumpur, malaysia. please sample our songs. if you like what you hear, you can download them from iTunes or AmazonMP3.

thanks for listening.

8 ears.

P.S. sorry for the SPAM.
9 years ago
Plenum wrote:
Yay you're doing well!
9 years ago
downloading